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VIAJE REDONDO: CINE MUDO MEXICANO EN LOS ESTADOS UNIDOS 1900-1930 - ON MARCH 31, 2014, A NEW EDITION OF THIS ELECTRONIC BOOK WILL INCLUDE THE INTRODUCTION'S ENGLISH VERSION FOR THE SAME PRICE.


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COLLECTIBLE BILINGUAL BOOK: BEAUTIES OF MEXICAN CINEMA, HARDCOVER, 20% OFF here



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Guillermo Calles (1891-1958), a Mexican of Tarahumara descent, was born in Chihuahua. He migrated to the United States as a child and later became the first Mexican actor in Hollywood.  His career as a stunt, extra and supporting actor spanned almost two decades in California; alas, he is not mentioned neither in books about Hispanics in Hollywood or in volumes about silent western films and serials.  Eventually, Calles fulfilled his dream to be not just an actor, but producer, writer, director and leading man, as well as distributor of his own films. For some time, he was an icon for many Mexican immigrants and Mexican Americans, who shared his nationalistic views and saw his success as their own. Thousands of people crowded the theaters to enjoy his personal appearances and his movies. Guillermo was also the first Mexican in making a film with synchronized sound. Learn more about his fascinating life and career here. For more information about its biography, written by Rogelio Agrasánchez Jr. and published by McFarland, Inc., go here ; the page includes a book review by renowned writer, poet and editor Gabriel Trujillo Muñoz, an expert of culture and cinema in Baja California.

 

 

 

Viaje redondo: el cine mudo mexicano en los Estados Unidos, by Rogelio Agrasánchez Jr. A book about Mexican silent film distribution, exhibition, and reception in the United States, 1900-1930. Volume in Spanish (a new edition including the book's introduction in English will be available soon).

See details here .

The book has been presented for the first time at the Mexican Consulate in Brownsville, Texas, on May 16, 2013.

Available for sale in CD or as a downloadable file.


 


The story behind...


THE IMAGE 



Naná production still (1943)



THE ARTIFACT 



Estudios Tenochtitlán stock certificate



THE LOST FILM 



La vorágine: a film lost to whim

Discover, learn, enjoy


 Unsung film pioneers
Get to know the fascinating men and women that started Mexican film, through articles based on original research.   


Mexican movies in the United States

Since the silent era, scores of Spanish-speaking moviegoers living in the United States have had a penchant for Mexican movies, which have provided them with an identity, contact with their national roots, and entertainment. Rediscover the history of those movies, theaters, and audiences.


Film advertising: art and business

Mexican film advertising was more than just an effective marketing tool. Talented painters, illustrators, graphic designers, cartoonists, and photographers made Mexican film propaganda unique. In this section, you will discover their impressive works and techniques.


Film as historical record

Purposefully or not, film is always a witness of its time, and a mirror of the spectators it was created for. Discover how Mexican movies are a rich resource for anyone interested in learning more about the country and its people.


Personal encounters
Informal interviews with producers, directors and actors that contributed to the Golden Age of Mexican cinema.


Galleries 

Our galleries are a way to share the archive's holdings with our visitors.

About this site


This website is sponsored and maintained by the Agrasánchez Film Archive.  It is addressed to the general public and also to students and scholars interested in Mexican film and culture.


We aim to promote the study and appreciation of Mexican film through informed articles and the suggestion of new routes for film history research.


Articles and interviews are published here in the language they were originally written, whether Spanish or English.


 more about the archive